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Grace Wall, Program Associate Intern, Jolkona Internship

Jolkona is happy to to offer an internship opportunity to Seattle University student Grace Wall. Grace joins the team as a Program Associate intern and will work alongside our Executive Director to gain firsthand nonprofit experience. She will contribute to the growth and development of Jolkona’s social entrepreneur community and the Catalyst program. She will also be learning about Jolkona’s donors through a variety of fundraising projects.

Grace is a second year student at Seattle University in the Matteo Ricci College’s Humanities for Leadership degree program. The program teaches students to better understand themselves, the world around them, and their place within that world. Students learn how to more effectively interact and work with other people in leadership capacities.

Students improve their leadership capabilities by participating in both a local and international internship during their four years at Seattle University. They learn about the structure and organization of the professional world through real world, hands-on experience. Students can then better understand how to be more effective in their future roles as professionals.

This will be Jolkona’s second Seattle University intern but our first Matteo Ricci intern. We are thrilled to continue developing this local partnership with Seattle University. Grace is excited to work with Jolkona as part of the team. Her prior experience includes working as an accounting clerk as well as a lifeguard and swimming instructor. Grace is passionate about entrepreneurship and interested in better understanding how to be effective and successful in the professional world.

Many of Grace’s family members are entrepreneurs. From a young age she has seen what it takes to run a business having spent time around her family’s companies. In the future, she hopes to be an active member of the Wall Family Enterprise Business Advisory Council as well as possibly run her parents’ company, Hatch Building Supply, once her father retires.

For now, Grace is focusing on succeeding as a university student and Army ROTC Cadet at Seattle University. She values dedication and is ready to work hard and learn new things. You can learn more about Grace Wall on her LinkedIn page.

Editor’s Note: Keegan Falk is the social media intern here at Jolkona and the voice behind our Facebook page. You can connect with Keegan here or on Twitter @Keego27.


With graduation coming up, I want to do something to celebrate my time at Seattle University and with Jolkona as an intern. Consider it a final project to stick in my portfolio as I head into the workforce. My last hurrah if you will.

What I’ve done is made my own campaign with Jolkona (anyone can do this using our start your own campaign feature). The project I chose for my campaign is one to help tutor children in Guatemala where over 60 percent of the people do not complete elementary school and the national illiteracy rate is over 70 percent. These people need help.

The name of my campaign is 50 for 50 as I am looking for 50 students locally in Seattle to give to 50 students globally in Guatemala.

For $10 you can help tutor a child for one month.

Your donation will help cover books and supplies, pay for tutors, and help maintain the class and learning areas. You will also receive information about the student you are helping along with a photo as proof of your impact. At Jolkona 100% of your donation goes directly to the project, always.

I am asking for 50 donations to help 50 students.

I ask you to imagine where you would be without an early education. What would you do if you couldn’t read or write? As a student, I love being in the classroom, learning and interacting with my professors. With this campaign, I want to encourage others to share that passion of learning with those who really need it.

I want to show students like me that giving doesn’t require much.

Here at Jolkona one of our key messages is low-cost high-impact. My generation is looking to change the world but we can’t always do that. With classes, internships, homework, jobs and social life, many students don’t have the time or money to be a philanthropist. With micro-charities like Jolkona, it takes as little as $5 to make a considerable change.

My goal for this campaign is to help 50 students in Guatemala by June 12, the day I graduate. Will you help me reach my goal?

You can give here: 50 Students Locally Helping 50 Students Globally.

Jolkona interns Keegan Falk and Kim Kish hard at work changing the world

If you cannot make a donation, please share this with your friends and family via social media or email.

Thank you.

Taylor Corbett is a student at Occidental College in Los Angeles, CA, pursuing a double major in Economics and Diplomacy and World Affairs. This post is part of a series he wrote as part of an internship with BRAC’s Targeting the Ultra-poor program in Bangladesh.

As an American student in Bangladesh I have quickly learned that there is one question that I inevitably face in every greeting. Wedged somewhere between the handshake and friendly smiles slips the question, “What are you doing here?” It’s something I have been asked by customs agents, taxi drivers, chai wallahs, school teachers, businessmen, village leaders, and even friends. In Bangladesh this is a completely justified question. With virtually no tourism industry and monsoon season fast approaching, many wonder why someone would come to their country to tromp around isolated villages for days at a time. The simplicity of my response has, thus far, never failed to solicit a smile. “I have come to learn from you,” I always tell them.

The context of my response can be found eight months prior as I read Nicholas Kristof’s column titled “More Schools, Not Troops.” In his column, Kristof compares the different developmental paths of Bangladesh and Pakistan in the 30 years since their partition in 1971. Pakistan, choosing to spend its aid dollars on military spending has come to face a militarized and divided society. In contrast, Bangladesh has chosen to focus on educational and societal development, which Kristof argues, has led to healthier, better educated, and less radicalized society. He went on to attribute this progress, in part, to an NGO called BRAC for their education and development initiatives. As an international relations and economics major, studying how development organizations can provide effective solutions to pervasive transnational issues (such as terrorism or insurgencies) is my academic dream. Clearly interested, I did what any information hungry American does, I Googled-it.

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