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Our first five participants in Project Catalyst, Jolkona’s new accelerator for social entrepreneurs from developing countries, will come from Indonesia to Seattle. This 2-week intensive workshop will further hone their business plans, gain valuable insights, and meet prospective investors. We can’t wait to welcome them to our offices on June 8!

Over the next three weeks, we will profile each entrepreneur. Our first feature is Nadya Saib, 27, whose project, Wangsa Jelita, produces non-toxic, natural personal care products to address environmental issues of waste while empowering local farmers and artisans. Read below to see what Nadya has to say about her nephews, about entrepreneurship, about rose farmers, and more.

Q: Outside of this project and work, what else do you do for fun in Indonesia? What other passions do you have?

I think everyone has their own definition of fun. For me, playing with and poking fun at my nephews is so much fun. I consider my family as one of the most significant elements in my life, so spending quality time with them, whenever possible, is one of the best ways to spend my time outside of work. Once in a while, I speak about entrepreneurship to youth, students, and other fellow entrepreneurs. I find sharing as a good reminder for me. I’m also part of the Global Shapers Jakarta Hub, an initiative under the World Economic Forum. Being part of this group gives me the chance to meet like-minded people, which triggers an inspirational jolt in me. For me, that is fun too.

Wangsa Jelita slide campaignQ: So, what inspired you to start this venture?

The fact that there is no pharmaceutical regulation of the word “natural” encouraged my two friends and me to create something that would embody the true concept of “natural.” That was the initial idea. So right after we got our bachelor degrees back in 2008, the three of us, pharmacists by training, started “Wangsa Jelita”–which means “Beautiful Dynasty.” We carefully chose only “good” ingredients to put in our formulation of personal care products and picked out the best processes to make them. It was a kind of hobby at first, something we enjoyed doing, something we were excited about. About a year after that, we met local farmers by chance, and we were inspired to expand Wangsa Jelita. The spirit of introducing and producing truly natural personal care products remains the same, but the way we conduct our business has evolved–from a traditional profit maximizing business to a social enterprise that empowers local communities.

Q: Tell us a story of a person who has benefited from your program.

I suppose I should tell you about the moment when my team told rose farmers about the idea of utilizing the roses to produce soaps. Some laughed, some asked whether we can make soap out of other kinds of flowers and/or veggies, some didn’t see the value in doing so. But the best thing was that most of them wanted to know more about our idea and wanted to take part. We held a year-long program to teach women farmers to add value to their roses by producing rose water extract and rose soaps. In an interview, a rose farmer said that she’s proud of herself for having new skill as well augmenting her family income.

Q: What is one obstacle you have faced in running the program? How did you overcome it?

I’ve learned to contend with my assumptions; may it be about how the business should be run, or how to maintain the relationships with the communities and customers, or even what kind of products should be developed. I think every leader has their own assumption and sometimes, they have the tendency to be very firm about it, and I’ve learned that this tendency has the potential to harm the company. The first step of how I overcame it was by acknowledging it. Our job is finding the best path should be taken so that the company can meet its goals, to serve more people. So the next step I took was teaching myself and my team to listen to our stakeholders more, and to listen carefully. And I found that this way has made a big difference to me and my team, particularly in our way to run the business.

Q: What are you looking forward to when you come to the United States as a part of Project Catalyst?

Foremost, meeting the mentors is what I’m very much looking forward to. It always excites me to meet people who have been there and done that. I really wish I can learn as much as possible from Project Catalyst, and hopefully, in one way or another, I, too, can benefit everyone I encounter in the program.

We are very excited to have Nadya Saib here in Seattle! If you are interested in helping these amazing entrepreneurs, Project Catalyst is recruiting for mentors, coaches and hosts! If you are available between June 8 and 22, please contact catalyst@jolkona.org.

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My friends and I fell in love with Myanmar (Burma) before Hilary Clinton ever set foot in there. In the May of 2010, no one I knew had ever been. Back then, Nobel Peace Prize winner Aung San Suu Kyi was still under house arrest, and the military regime limited travelers’ access to certain parts of the country. Right on the heels of North Korea, it was the second most isolated country in the world.

Since the junta overthrew a democratic government in 1969, to the outside world, Myanmar became synonymous with systematic human rights violations, forced relocations, drug trafficking, and poverty. But what my friends and I found there were beautiful Buddhist temples and golden pagodas, as well as the most generous, most kind-hearted nation of people. Everywhere we went, the Burmese smiled at us, waved to us, shouted mingalaba! On a full day of trekking through the hills of Kalaw, two remote villages welcomed us into their wedding festivities, fed us steeped tea and lavish meals. On our way home, we stumbled upon a Nepalese ceremony, and the people offered us even more food, more drinks, more candies. Their children accompanied us halfway back to Kalaw, singing and dancing as they skipped beside us, chatting in Burmese, laughing.

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Team Stupa. May 2010.

Like most Burmese children, I later learned, most of these singing and laughing children had never touched a picture book. The educational system in Myanmar had been practically non-existent; the illiteracy rate among those over 15 and older stood at 2.5 million people in 2011. According to United Nations International Children’s Emergency Fund (UNICEF), 33% of school-aged children in Myanmar do not attend school and 70% of those who do are unable to finish at the primary level. Much of this is due to the lack of funds in barely maintained educational institutions, as well as the general poverty in the country that forces children out of schools at a young age in order to earn wages for their families.

In recent years, the junta has started handing over its power to a democratic system in non-bloody, non-violent reform, and willingly opened its doors to the outside world. As Burma embarks on such a historic transformation, the education of its children becomes more important than ever. Educational Empowerment provides Burmese children access to an educational environment in Myanmar that improves their future economic opportunities. Not only does EE provide books for children and develop community and monastic school libraries, it also aims to provide teachers with trainings and materials.

I would gladly support any organization working to build a democratic future for the brave, kind-hearted people of Myanmar. Through Give Direct to EE, we can play a part in ensuring children education and economic success at a critical time in the building of a free Myanmar! Give today! Every dollar matters!

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This Sunday, May 11, is Mother’s Day: the day we celebrate moms and what they do for us and our communities. Many of us take this opportunity to shower our mothers with gifts, cards and affection — but what about giving a gift that also impacts a mother in need?

Jolkona is here to help you find a Mother’s Day gift that honors moms in more ways than one. Your donations can support three projects that improve maternal health in Palestine, Guatemala and India.

Support Safe Births in Palestine

Your gift through MADRE will provide a “safe birth” medical kit, and help train and equip Israeli and Palestinian midwives to deliver babies in the West Bank. Due to movement restrictions, an estimated 2500 Palestinian women face difficulties on their way to hospitals and birthing facilities. With your help, midwives can reduce maternal and infant mortality, by providing the resources needed for a safe pregnancy and successful delivery.

Provide Maternal and Prenatal care in Guatemala

Your gift through Project Concern International (PCI) will help indigenous Guatemalan women living in isolated rural communities have access to prenatal care, as well as safe and clean birthing facilities. With your help, PCI will train hundreds of community health workers to make sure both mothers and babies are healthy and safe before, during, and after delivery.

Provide Prenatal care in Calcutta

Your gift through Calcutta kids will help provide six months of prenatal care, a safe birthing facility, and post-partum care for a woman living in the slums of Calcutta. Calcutta Kids uses community-based programs to optimize the health of both mother and child throughout pregnancy, leading to higher birth weights, and better immune and neurological development.

When you celebrate Mother’s Day by giving a gift in your mom’s honor to one of these Jolkona partner projects, you know you are making your own mother proud by aiding another in need. Happy Mother’s Day!

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Imagine a city that is carbon neutral, has zero emissions, uses sustainable energy sources and  builds a comprehensive public transportation. This is the “city of the future,” according to the Earth Day Network’s Green Cities Campaign – and a future not too far away, especially here in Seattle.

Seattle is consistently ranked among the top Green Cities in the U.S. due to our ordinances to reduce the impacts of climate change and use of sustainable energy. Not only is Seattle home to the world’s greenest commercial building, the Bullit Center, but we also have the University of Washington’s campus-wide dedication to composting and a growing light rail system. Even more, Seattle is pioneering the use of coastal underwater turbines – a sustainable source of hydroelectric power that doesn’t impact important rivers and waterways. With our commitment to innovation in philanthropy, Jolkona is proud to call Seattle home.

The Green Cities campaign, a feature of Earth Day 2014, encourages cities to update their infrastructures and building codes to reduce emissions, increase efficiency and emphasize the development of key areas like public transportation, green buildings and renewable energy.

In honor of Earth Day 2014, YOU can take action in your community to promote the Green City vision. It is never too late to support a clean future for your home! Learn more from the Earth Day Network.

You can also support Earth Day globally by funding a project through Jolkona that supports the environment.

This Earth Day, join Jolkona in celebrating Seattle, the green city we call home, and work to improve sustainability both in your community and globally!

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Earth Day is less than a week away, and an excellent time to reflect on what we can do to celebrate our planet and keep it healthy.

When we focus on sustainable agricultural practices or conservation, we can improve global health and help lift people out of extreme poverty. Of course, meaningful change starts with what we do from day to day to take better care of our planet.

Here are some things Jolkona is doing to help the environment. What will you be doing?

  1. Jolkona HQ is getting new recycling bins, thanks to Partner Coordinator, Ross Polk. Now we can be more responsible with our office waste. Perhaps a compost bin is in the future?
  2. Aparna Rae, our Development Manager, receives a CSA box (community supported agriculture) where she gets a variety of fresh produce directly from local farmers. Learn more about CSAs in her guest post tomorrow!
  3. Nicole, our Communications Manager, is taking a thermos everywhere she goes, so that she can avoid using disposable coffee cups.
  4. Give to educate farmers in Kenya in bio-intensive farming, so they can better feed their families, farm sustainably, and support bio-diversity.
  5. Give to conserve the rainforest in Tanzania, and reduce poverty by empowering local villages to maintain and protect the forest.
  6. Give to conserve Rainforests in Bangladesh through Lift Bangla, by restoring water supply to the indigenous community so they can continue to farm sustainably.

Whether you make small changes in your own life, like getting a CSA box and reducing waste like Aparna and Nicole, or you donate $10 to a nonprofit project that supports our environment, you will make a difference for our planet. With only a couple days until Earth Day, why not start now?

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What do mosquitoes, freshwater snails and ticks have in common? All three are vectors – critters that transmit deadly diseases like malaria and dengue fever – and therefore major villains in this year’s vector-borne disease themed World Health Day, the April 7th World Health Organization observance that raises awareness of serious global health problems.

Three facts to think about over the weekend:

  • More than 1 billion people are infected and more than 1 million die from vector-borne diseases every year.
  • Vector-borne diseases account for more than 17 percent of all infectious diseases.
  • Malaria causes more than 600 000 deaths every year globally, most of them children under 5 years old.

Many of these diseases are preventable, primarily by improving access to clean water and sanitation. Jolkona’s partner MADRE works in Kenya to provide sources of clean water in rural, indigenous communities. This project builds communal collection points in villages in schools, and trains local people in hygiene, health, and water system maintenance.

Along with preventing and treating vector-borne diseases, our health partners also work hard to improve access to prenatal care, lifesaving surgeries and prosthetics. You can make a difference, too, by supporting any of these projects:

You can observe World Health Day on Monday by learning more about vector-borne diseases and contributing to a global health project — even with just $10. As we say here at Jolkona: every drop counts.

Photo Credit: WHO/S. Hollyman

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Jolkona’s mission is to engage a new generation of philanthropists, by making giving easy, meaningful and transparent. Millennials like me (ages 22-35) yearn for something more when it comes to philanthropy: we want to go beyond making donations, to be truly engaged with social change. According to Nonprofit Quarterly, while older generations value giving time and financial support to organizations, we millennials want to be excited and passionate about a cause — learning new skills and expanding our networks along the way.

The evolution of Jolkona’s Give Together campaign, our monthly giving program, reflects our mission and millennial perspective. Starting at $10/month, members are invited to our private Facebook group, where you can view project proposals from our nonprofit partners, discuss the pros and cons, and lobby for your favorite. It’s a unique way to learn about different causes, engage in the grant-making process, and network with a community of passionate, like-minded donors.

In the same way that engaging millennials is the driving force in 21st century philanthropy, empowering women is the driving force of global development. This month’s Give Together theme is “Women & Girls,” tied to our March Give to Girls campaign, with nine projects targeting women’s education, maternal health and empowerment. Give Together is our bonus tenth option: we’re considering three proposals to change girls’ lives in Afghanistan (Barakat), Nepal (Bo M. Karlsson Foundation) and Nicaragua (MADRE). Join Give Together before March 31, and help us choose which innovative project gets this month’s grant.

When you Give Together, you can be part of the changing face of philanthropy. You can give with a network of other passionate philanthropists, and be more knowledgable than ever about the projects you support. Give Together for Girls.

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When I was fresh out of college and teaching in Singapore, I spent a whole day on MRT subways and buses all over the country — in search of a women’s basketball. I found myself trying to explain to young men and women, in both English and Mandarin, what a “women’s basketball” was… Anyway, I couldn’t find one. Eventually, I discovered that although hundreds of boys’ secondary school basketball teams participated in Singapore’s interscholastic league, only about 30 girls’ teams did. That was when I really, really realized how much Title IX had done for girls in the United States —and how lucky we are to be gaining more gender equality with every generation.

After more travels, including teaching in Honduras and backpacking through Central America, I came to Seattle and earned a Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing. As Jolkona’s newest Communications Intern, I’m thrilled to use my love of writing and global development to raise awareness for social change, to bring to the page what I have witnessed abroad and turn it into action.

Jolkona provides young professionals and backpackers like me on limited budgets a platform to donate and, drop by drop, make every single dollar matter — whether it’s in providing children in Mexico with fresh producesupporting safe births for women in Palestine, or creating jobs for silk weavers in India.

By joining the Jolkona team, I will no longer be just another tourist who has passed by; my experiences can continue contributing to a worthy cause. I’m excited to work with a group of like-minded volunteers who are committed to making a difference, one day, one dollar, one drop at a time.

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And finally, as an advocate for women’s rights, I’m excited to be joining Jolkona during its annual Give to Girls campaign — supporting 10 nonprofit projects that help women and girls locally and globally. Join us!

Bea Chang received her MFA in fiction from the University of Washington, Seattle. Her stories and essays have appeared in Colere: A Journal of Cultural Exploration, Toasted Cheese, and Memoir Journal. Since 2007, she has lived in and backpacked through 50 countries. 

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As we enter the final week of our annual Give to Girls campaign, in honor of Women’s History Month, I asked the ladies of Jolkona, “Which woman inspires you?” The responses reveal a spectrum of diverse role models, locally and globally:

I’m reminded of a quote by Marissa Mayer, CEO of Yahoo and a personal source of hope and inspiration: “I always did something I was a little not ready to do. I think that’s how you grow. When there’s that moment of ‘Wow, I’m not really sure I can do this,’ and you push through those moments, that’s when you have a breakthrough.”

I ask you to take a moment to think about a woman or girl you admire. How does she inspire you? When you Give to Girls, you are investing in the next generation of inspirational women, creating a global ripple effect of hope. Please Give to Girls today!

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Jolkona’s Give to Girls campaign revolves around the idea that the world’s women — over half the global population — are a significant untapped resource. Women represent 70 percent of the world’s poor, disproportionately suffering in times of crisis: natural disasters, economic downturns, wars. On the other hand, as more women gain equality in the workforce, the faster a country’s economy will recover and grow.

This doesn’t only apply to the developing world; America’s GDP would jump by 9 percent if we had equal pay. Empowering women, along with giving them access to better healthcare and education, is the key to local and global development.

You can help three Jolkona partners empower women:

Give Life and Tech Skills to Homeless Women in the U.S.

Many homeless women in the U.S. can’t get back on their feet because they lack the skills needed to find jobs in today’s economy. Jolkona’s partner the Jubilee Women’s Center, works to help Seattle women transition out of extreme poverty, with a comprehensive life and tech skills program including classes in Microsoft Office, interview and job retention practices.

Support Rape Survivors in Haiti Displacement Camp

Four years after Haiti’s catastrophic earthquake, more than 100,000 people are still living in tent camps — unstable conditions that have made women even more vulnerable to sexual violence. Jolkona’s partner MADRE provides peer-counseling groups to help rape survivors empower each other and heal together, and works with local organizations to build effective community anti-violence strategies.

Support Women Farmers in Sudan

Women in Sudan grow 80 percent of the food crops, yet are excluded from government farm aid programs. The country’s farmers also struggle to survive the ongoing war, environmental degradation from unsustainable practices, and droughts and floods from climate change. Jolkona’s partner MADRE provides women farmers with tools, seeds, and ongoing training — enabling them to feed their families and achieve financial independence.

With the right set of tools, any woman can become empowered, and empowered women are one of the greatest potential forces for global change. Give to Girls today!

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Giving birth is one of the most dangerous things a woman can do, especially in a developing country. But with your help, Jolkona’s Give to Girls campaign is raising funds this month for programs focused on improving maternal health in Palestine, Guatemala, and India.

According to the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, around 300,000 women die in childbirth every year; according to the World Health Organization (WHO) nearly 5 million babies die before their first birthday every year. This doesn’t include the women and children who suffer permanent injuries, malnutrition and physical and neurological under development. The good news is that many of these deaths and injuries are preventable, if we can improve access to adequate prenatal and maternal health services.

Each of these Give to Girls projects aim to help women have safe pregnancies and healthy babies:

Support Safe Births in Palestine

Due to its status as a conflict zone, Palestine is a difficult place for a woman to give birth; maternal health conditions have actually been in decline since 2000. Jolkona’s partner MADRE works to provide prenatal care and safe births and prevent unnecessary deaths for women in West Bank, who are unable to access a hospital or adequate care.

MADRE works with Palestinian and Israeli midwives to provide training, prenatal supplements, portable ultrasound devices and birth kits, so that as many women as possible can deliver their babies safely.

Reduce Infant Mortality in Guatemala

Guatemala has the highest infant mortality rate in South America. The majority of these deaths occur in rural indigenous populations, among the poorest 20 percent of people in Guatemala. Jolkona’s partner Project Concern International provides an integrated infant and maternal health program to bring proper clinical care for women, and and low-tech care techniques to parents and care-takers to ensure a higher chance of infant survival.

Effecting over 1500 women and children, your donation to PCI will provide a clean environment and clinical care to the mother, as well as transportation to a hospital for her birth.

Provide Prenatal Care in India

Even though India is rapidly industrializing, it has an infant mortality rate 100 times higher than other industrial nations. Adequate prenatal care not only helps thousands of babies survive their first year, but also reduces susceptibility to malnutrition, disease, and underdevelopment. Jolkona’s partner Calcutta Kids is focused on increasing access to health and nutrition services, providing health information and encouraging positive health-changing behaviors.

Calcutta Kids provides six months of prenatal care for a pregnant woman in the slums of Calcutta, as well as delivery in a private facility, and follow up care for two years following birth.

When you Give to Girls to support maternal health, you not only help women and babies survive delivery, but also set them up for a healthier future. Please Give to Girls today!

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Why do we give to girls? Because we must, if we want to reduce violence, promote equality, build stronger economies and improve a plethora of other crucial development measures locally and globally.

Halfway into our annual Give to Girls campaign, which highlights education, maternal health and empowerment projects this year, I’ve asked the ladies at Jolkona HQ: “Why should we give to girls?” The responses vary, but all come down to making the world a better place for our generation, and a brighter place for the next generation:

So we ask you today: what compels you to give to girls? Let us know in the Comments section, and through our social media channels.

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Everyone knows that educating girls improves their career opportunities. But did you also know that educating girls reduces child mortality and kickstarts developing countries?

The Global Education Fund reports that each year that a girl spends in secondary school, her future income increases by 15 to 25 percent. An educated girl invests 90 percent of her income in her family and community. When a mother has received a basic education, her children are 40 percent more likely to survive past the age of five. When looking at the 50 million girls that currently live in poverty, just imagine the impact that educating these girls could have on the world!

Through Jolkona’s Give to Girls campaign this month, you can support education projects in Afghanistan, Liberia and Nepal. For these three countries, which have some of the lowest GDPs and literacy rates, improving education for girls is absolutely essential.

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Improve Female Literacy in Afghanistan

Only 11 to 13 percent of girls and women in Afghanistan are literate, due the distances to travel to schools, caring for infants, and the social and cultural taboos related to attending co-ed schools, having contact with male teachers, and female education in general. But educating and empowering Afghanistan’s women is essential to lifting the country out of decades of war.

Barakat, Jolkona’s nonprofit partner on the ground, has an innovative curriculum that enables girls and women to become literate in a safe environment: all-female classes and teachers, community spaces, no restrictions on age or bringing babies to class. Barakat already engages 3,000 girls and women with their literacy programs. A Give to Girls gift of $60 will provide a Lower Level Literacy Education for one girl. 

Educate Girls in Liberia

More than 60 percent of Liberia’s school-aged children are not in school, including the most vulnerable girls in the country: orphans, homeless children, sex workers, and children of single parents. Jolkona’s nonprofit partner More Than Me believes that these low rates of education are directly related to the low life expectancy and other health problems Liberians face.

MTM’s program provides vulnerable girls in Liberia the opportunity to go to school, while also learning about nutrition, disease prevention and vaccination — giving them the tools they need to lead fuller, healthier lives. A donation of just $25 will provide two girls with school supplies, and $100 will provide a whole semester of education.

Educate Enslaved Nepali Girls

Struggling with extreme poverty, many families in Western Nepal take their daughters out of school and sell them into bonded service, known as Kamlari. The Nepal Youth Foundation works to rescue these girls by returning them to their family, helping the family develop another source of income, and prevent future trafficking through education.

NYF has rescued and educated more than 10,000 girls since its inception in 1990, and with your help, they can help even more. A gift of $100 will rescue one Nepali girl. Even just $5 can make a huge difference. 

Here at Jolkona, we are excited to support women’s education this month, since so many other causes hinge on the education and professional success of girls. Join us, and Give to Girls today.

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In honor of International Women’s Day, I joined other nonprofit communicators at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation on Friday to discuss ways we could use social media to promote women’s health initiatives, including PATH’s redesigned female condom, self-administered contraceptive shots (see photo — so tiny!) and low-tech cervical and breast cancer screenings.

This #GatesSocial also got me thinking about more ways to inform and engage donors for Jolkona’s 4th annual Give to Girls campaign, which is crowdfunding for 10 projects that save lives, educate and empower women locally and globally. What would inspire you? We’d love to produce something like the Girl Effect video:

Stay tuned for some new Jolkona media for this year’s #Give2Girls. In the meantime, check out the traditional press release about the campaign.

SEATTLE – Launched on International Women’s Day (March 8) and continuing through Women’s History Month, Jolkona’s 4thannual Give to Girls campaign is crowdfunding for 10 innovative projects to lift up women and girls in the United States and strategic regions of Latin America, Africa and Asia.

“We inspire the women of tomorrow by giving to girls today,” says Nadia Mahmud, Jolkona co-founder and CEO. “Empowering women is one of the most effective ways to fight poverty around the world. Invest in a healthy and educated girl today, and she will be able to reinvest in her family, her community, and our world tomorrow.”

From now through March 31, donors can choose among nine high-impact projects related to education, maternal health and empowerment. Starting at the $5 level, the options range from supporting job training for homeless women in Seattle topromoting female literacy in Afghanistan to funding counseling services for rape survivors in Haiti.

The bonus project will be selected by members of Jolkona’s monthly Give Together program: starting at the $10 level, participants join a private Facebook group to review proposals from nonprofit partners and determine which one should be awarded the community’s collective grant. For this campaign, Give Together is also accepting one-time donations, in addition to monthly subscriptions.

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Last week, dozens of women in Saudi Arabia got behind the wheel. Driving while female may seem trivial or mundane to us, but this is a major act of courage for Saudi women. While driving is technically not illegal for women in Saudi Arabia, they are banned from obtaining driver’s licenses, along with countless other acts of independence. Yet over 60 women (most equipped with international driver’s licenses and experience) coordinated a “drive-in” and posted videos of their activity online, continuing a small but persistent movement for improving women’s rights.

The Associated Press reports that the first time a Saudi female driving protest took place, in 1990, 50 women were arrested, had their passports confiscated and lost their jobs. But not a single woman was arrested on Wednesday. Activist and professor Aziza Youssef explained that they plan to continue driving and posting photos and videos, which they hope will normalize the notion of women driving. Check out some of their videos on The Guardian’s website.

Youssef and the other female Saudi drivers are an inspiration for women empowerment efforts everywhere, including partners and participants in Jolkona’s Women and Girls Give Together campaign. We believe that when given the right economic support and educational tools to rise out of poverty and oppression, women can make an incredible impact on the world.

If you want to make an impact of your own for women and girls, there’s only a few days left in this month’s Give Together campaign, with collective funds going to support Jubilee Women’s Center, MADRE, and the Bo M. Karlsson Foundation. We have $1,500 in matching funds from the Seattle International Foundation, which will double these Give Together donations and amplify October gifts to our Give Direct projects that also support women and girls.

Time is running out: help empower a woman or girl today!

Photo by MARWAN NAAMANI/AFP/Getty Images

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