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Guest post written by Noah Levinson, founder and director of Calcutta Kids

Every hour, 40 young children in India die from a disease which has afflicted every person reading this blog at one time or another — diarrhea. For most of us, diarrhea is a mere annoyance, a discomfort, one easily remedied by a few Pepto-Bismol tablets. But for hundreds of thousands of children in India and the developing world, diarrhea kills. In fact, diarrhea remains the second leading killer of children in the world. Jolkona partner Calcutta Kids is saving lives with a proven model of treatment and education that costs a mere $10 per child.

child being treated at Calcutta Kids Diarrhea Treatment Center
Child receiving oral rehydration solution at the Calcutta Kids Diarrhea Treatment Center

Effective, inexpensive treatment saves lives

It’s not actually the diarrhea that kills, but rather the dehydration caused by the diarrhea. While oral rehydration solution (ORS) is readily available throughout India, it is often misused or not enough of it is given to properly rehydrate the child. Providing ORS in a clinical setting greatly increases a child’s chance of survival.

Calcutta Kids has replicated the successful model of the International Center for Diarrheal Disease Research, which annually treats more than 180,000 diarrhea-afflicted patients in Bangladesh by providing oral rehydration solution in a clinical setting. Situated in a slum area outside of Kolkata, India, Calcutta Kids’ clinic officially opened in March 2011. Since then, it has successfully treated more than 200 young children with a combination of treatments: ORS, zinc, and very occasional use of antibiotics, plus behavior-change communication to promote good hygiene habits. Treatments usually last two to four hours, and families receive a follow-up home visit by a trained health worker to ensure that the child is recuperating and to provide life-saving information to the child’s caretaker.

One of the innovative components of this treatment is that the protocol is guided by a database to ensure that each step is followed. Through alarms in the database, nurses are informed when the next checkup must take place; through a graph, the doctor can estimate the child’s level of dehydration. The database also ensures that a trained health worker provides behavior-change communication before the child can be discharged.

Calcutta Kids' Diarrhea Treatment Center
Mothers receiving training and education to treat and prevent diarrhea

How you can help

Through Jolkona, Calcutta Kids has found a platform through which we can sustain our efforts to fight these senseless child deaths from diarrhea. At a cost of only $10 per treatment, we hope that people of all means will be able to finance one diarrhea treatment each month — and quite possibly, save a child’s life. We also encourage caring individuals and families to commemorate a loved one’s birthday or a holiday with a truly meaningful gift: a second chance at life for a child.

And when you donate to Calcutta Kids, we will make sure that you know how your money has been spent by sending you a digital copy of the discharge certificate of the treated child (with the name omitted for confidentiality purposes) with a full explanation of the services provided.

Noah Levinson, MPH, is the founder and executive director of Calcutta Kids, a nonprofit organization he founded while he was an undergraduate student at Marlboro College. He is also a founding board member of Jolkona Foundation and has provided Jolkona with invaluable guidance since our early days.

Calcutta Kids is an organization committed to the empowerment of the poorest children and expecting mothers in the underserved slums in and around Kolkata, India. Calcutta Kids is well versed at leveraging its resources — something we seek to emulate at Jolkona Foundation.

Here at Jolkona, we like to talk about how our projects line up with the United Nations Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). But we haven’t talked much about what the MDGs are and why they are important.

What are the Millennium Development Goals?

The United Nations MDGs are the most current and probably most important multi-lateral development effort in the world to date. While “development” is a somewhat nebulous term, in this case it refers to any effort by governments or nonprofits to improve, among other things, the living conditions, health or education of a country or people group. This could range from small rural medical clinics to massive infrastructure projects such as new dams or highways.

Before the MDGs, development work was mostly done piecemeal, with organizations and governments determining their own goals and metrics for success. The MDGs represent the first time every member country of the UN — along with a number of nongovernmental organizations — agreed to the same development objectives, committing to see eight specific and measurable goals achieved by 2015.

History of the Millennium Development Goals

In 1996, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development began working on a framework for what the goals and strategies of development in the 21st century would look like. The Millennium Development Goals are the combination of that framework and the Millennium Declaration, a document signed by all United Nations member countries after the September 2000 UN Millennium Summit. Since that time the MDGs have been the main framework for doing global development work.

Eight goals for development

There are eight goals identified by the MDGs, the first seven of which are measurable and the eighth which is more of an ideal than a goal:

  1. Eradicate extreme poverty and hunger
  2. Achieve universal primary education
  3. Promote gender equality and empower women
  4. Reduce child mortality rates
  5. Improve maternal health
  6. Combat HIV/AIDs, malaria and other diseases
  7. Ensure environmental stability
  8. Develop a global partnership for development

Why Jolkona uses the Millennium Development Goals

Though Jolkona does not pick projects based on their connection to the MDGs, all of our projects align with them. Connecting our projects to the MDGs allows Jolkona and donors to track how our work is contributing to key development metrics. Not only can you see your donation’s impact on a micro level — through the feedback you receive from our partners in the form of school grades, photos or field reports — but you can also see how your gifts are making a difference on a macro level as countries achieve the various goals. Your funding one child’s education, for example, also moves the country that child is in closer to achieving universal primary education, the second MDG.

How to get involved

Now that you have a better understanding of what the MDGs are, take a look here on the Impact page of the Jolkona site to sort projects by the specific MDG they work toward. On each project page you can also see which MDGs that project aligns with (note the colored bars on the right in the image below).

For the most up-to-date information and statistics on progress toward the goals, take a look at the UN’s MDG homepage.

You can also keep an eye on our blog — in the coming weeks, we’ll drill down on each of the goals, talking more about what they hope to achieve and highlighting Jolkona projects that work toward them.

Maheen with the children at Distressed Children International clinics

About three weeks ago, I walked into a room with a bench on one side and a desk on the other. There was another room in the back with a curtain partition for privacy. There was a doctor on the other side consulting with a patient I walked back into the waiting room, there was a mother there that had come in with her baby. The baby was strangely silent, and the mother was mentioning that her child had a constant fever and she didn’t know what was wrong. This “room” that I had walked into was one of DCI’s (Distressed Children & Infants International) clinics in Dhaka, Bangladesh. The clinic cares for and provides medical supplies and prescriptions to those cannot afford it and have nowhere else to go.

What led me to this clinic in Bangladesh was the Jolkona campaign I was a part of called the 12 Days of Giving. I decided to promote a health related project in Bangladesh and chose to support the DCI sponsored clinic, as public health is an interest of mine. I had never raised funds for anything prior to this experience nor had I promoted any type of project before! To be perfectly honest, I was attempting to pick whichever project I thought would be easily marketable so I would have a remote chance of fulfilling the looming $1,000 target goal. Not until I had a chance to visit the clinic and an orphanage also sponsored by DCI, and actually see those that were positively affected by the money raised, did I realize what $1,000 in Bangladesh really means.

Think about the anxiety that you feel when you’re sick for a couple of days and don’t know what is wrong. Not fun, huh? Now multiply this feeling times 100 to emphasize what toll that it takes on those “living” on the streets of Dhaka. The grave impact is felt not only because they do they not know what’s wrong with them when they’re sick, they know that they absolutely cannot walk into a hospital and get help, and whatever they have will probably only get worse.

Maheen with the children at Distressed Children International clinics

There are 450,000 children who live on the streets of Bangladesh and 30,000 die everyday due to circumstances of poverty. Through the DCI orphanage and with very little money, about 20 of these children are taken off the streets and are provided with healthcare, a good education, food, and shelter. With $10, a baby is provided with doctor care and relief. As demonstrated by the patients and kids at the DCI projects, a couple of dollars does not mean much to us here, but can most likely save a life and provide a child with a chance of having chance to enjoy a view of what life without poverty could really be…a reality.

I will never think about this project, these children, or $1,000 the same way again.

Maheen Aman is the Campus Outreach Lead for Jolkona and is extremely passionate about global health and development. She recently went on a global adventure that took her to Bangladesh and Turkey. This is a snapshot of one of her adventures.

When we announced the Give to Girls (Give2Girls) campaign on March 8th, the 100th Anniversary of International Women’s Day, the plan was to use the initial match of $2,000 to jumpstart the campaign and ignite excitement in investing in the women of tomorrow. But we did more than that — by the end of the day, we had raised almost $6,000, including the match, which will go down in Jolkona’s history as the highest single-day of fundraising we’ve had to date.

I want to stop there and let you re-read that last sentence.

That evening after launching the campaign, we hosted an event with CRAVE at PNK Ultra Lounge in downtown Seattle that was originally designed to launch the Give2Girls campaign, but because of your enormous support, the event turned into a celebration of the day and a call to rally around the campaign through the end of the month.

Well, continue the support is exactly what you did. During the three remaining weeks of March, I am thrilled to announce that the Give to Girls campaign raised just over $10,000 total for women and girls empowerment projects through Jolkona!

Thank you, thank you, thank you, to everyone who sponsored, donated, helped get the word out, and supported this movement!

Together, in a hair over three weeks, here is the impact we made towards empowering women and girls:

  • 2 girls educated in Nepal for 1 year
  • 2 girl educated in China
  • 2 girls educated for 1 year in India
  • 1 girl attended “self-esteem” training in USA
  • 4 days of doctor’s service provided in Bangladesh
  • 1 woman in Sudan received a farming land
  • 5 women trained in Haiti
  • 3 energy efficient stoves provided in Nepal
  • 3 weeks of food provided to safe houses in Iraq
  • 4 hygiene kits provided in Tanzania
  • 52 months of oral contraceptives supplied in Nepal
  • 2 Afghani refugees in Pakistan received year long scholarships
  • 2 neighborhood safe spaces provided in Haiti
  • 4 mothers and their children got nutritional support in India
  • 2 girls supported to attend day school in China
  • 2 literary texts provided in Niger
  • 2 days of medical supplies provided in Bangladesh
  • 9 hygiene kits provided in camps in Haiti
  • 3 solar lamps provided in Tanzania
  • 3 girls saved from “honor killing” in Iraq
  • 4 women’s stories sponsored in China
  • 9 weeks of health screenings in Bangladesh
  • 11 girls educated for 1 year in Afghanistan
  • 3 days of training and counseling provided in Haiti
  • 3 enslaved girls rescued in Nepal
  • 200 lbs of seeds provided to women farmers in Sudan
  • 6 field trips sponsored for girls in the USA
  • 2 young women mentors trained in Nepal
  • 1 girl trained in Pakistan
  • 1 year of training provided in Niger
  • 1 week of healthcare provided to a mother and her baby in Guatemala

Give 2 Girls Impact Map

Thank you to everyone in the Jolkona community for your tremendous support!

For those made one of the first $2,000 in donations, you will receive a proof of impact for the donation you made and the donation the Give2Girls fund matched on your behalf. Those gifts have already been added to your account, so you will be notified when they are completed.

To our donors: Thank you for contributing to the campaign and showing that individuals can make a huge difference in the world and small donations add up to create a big impact!

To our sponsors – Thank you, Hias Gourmet, Virtually Savvy, and Flaunt, Inc. for coming together to combine your dollars and create the matched fund that ignited this campaign. It worked. And we are thankful for your support.

To our partner – Thank you, CRAVE, including Melody Biringer, Nicole Shema, and the entire CRAVE team for partnering with us to turn an idea into a campaign and helping us show how important it is to support these projects.

Investing in women doesn’t stop here

You can continue to see the support of women and girls empowerment projects on the campaign page. Each of these projects tracks towards a larger goal, that of the UN Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), specifically MDG #3: Promote Gender Equality and Empower Women and MDG #5: Improve Maternal Health. If you’re as passionate about investing in the women of tomorrow as we are, we ask that you continue to support these projects and change the statistics.

Because as we know, women are vital when it comes to changing the world. And can you imagine what that world will look like?

Kick it with Kenya (KWIK) – a Jolkona project partner – is a community soccer tournament that leverages community gathering for sports to promote public health awareness. What is so innovative about this tournament is that it harnesses the power of the community in a fun way (who isn’t passionate about soccer?) to rally around their villages and also improve access to medical care and prevention. The tournament was hosted in Dago, and the Dago village team took home first place! It was amazing to see the spirit of the community and be a part of the talk of the town. Needless to say, the entire village was partying all night long at the orphanage center and will have another celebration to officially welcome home the trophy on Sunday evening.

The tournament brought together over 500 participants and even more spectators to show their support for each village and to receive medical treatment and counseling.

We had a chance to observe the clinics in action during the tournament and interview the medical team, which we will share with you in future posts. While the soccer games were  going on at the school field, the classrooms were converted to temporary health clinics. There was an optometrist, a nurse who diagnosed conditions and dispensed medications, and an HIV testing counselor. The community had access to free vaccinations and health mentors and advocates. This year, over 500 people were tested for HIV screening and over 250 patients received medical care and medications during the tournament.

It was such a privilege to see this project in action and experience how the donations from Jolkona are leveraged because of the triage of support from the dedicated community volunteers, the government, and generous in-kind donations secured by the tournament’s organizers.

Thank you to past donors who helped make the annual Kick it with Kenya soccer tournament possible! This tournament only happens once a year, and we welcome your support of this project throughout the year so that it can continue to grow and improve the lives and building of community in this rural part of Kenya.

Happy holidays from Dago, Kenya!

As part of Jolkona’s 12 Days of Giving, Team Africa is launching a campaign to sponsor 20 students to participate in the next KWIK soccer tournament. For $27, you can help promote public health awareness through a fun community event. Want to help make an impact for the holidays? Check out Team Africa’s campaign page.

If you are involved in the social sector, you are very familiar about the importance of measuring impact. Both donors and investors want to know that their money is being put into good use and consequently organizations want to show impact so that they can continue to receive funding for their projects.

Over the years the impact reporting has evolved starting from very passive forms of feedback to more proactive forms and it is worth taking a brief look at how impact reporting has evolved. The Revenue Act of 1918 for the first time established tax exemption for charitable bequests where donors would receive feedback related to acknowledgment of donations and tax exemption. Then the Internal Revenue Act of 1943 established the requirements for 501c3 organizations to annually submit their I-990s so nonprofits are now required to report back financial information of their work. In the 1950s, we saw organizations like World Vision starting to send photos of a child sponsored by the donor. It is important to note that is still a very popular program today, despite drawing strong criticisms. In the late 1990s and early 2000s we started seeing a new breed of organizations who used the power of the digital media to tell donors about the impact on the field. I would put organizations like Kiva, DonorsChoose, Global Giving, etc. in that group. When we look at organizations today and look at their annual reports, 100% of them talk about their impact and 99% of them are of the flavor “X girls educated” or “$Y million in loans given” or “Z meals provided”.

But, is that “true impact”? A popular phrase in our sector is, “Give a man a fish and you have fed him for a day.  Teach a man how to fish and you have fed him for a lifetime”. At Jolkona, we try to use that in partner selection process, during our talks, and on our website – I am sure someone sells that as a bumper sticker as well. Of course this phrase should not be taken literally. However, it does provide a good discussion point for this post. If an organization says that they taught “100 people to fish” is that good? It really depends. If every one of those 100 people were able to fish, sell their fish, and earn income for the family then, that’s great. What if only 10 out of those 100 people were able to earn income for the family (even though all 100 learned to fish)? Then, would we still consider this impact in the same regard?

Here is another example of impact reporting not being accurate. Often times organizations will talk about their impact as “X number of people impacted” where X is the person receiving the direct donation + their entire family and the rest of the people in the village. In the need to impress the funders with big numbers, organizations often try to maximize their impact footprint. Again, we have to ask is that “true impact”?

Ideally, we would want to figure out a systemic way of tracking detailed impact. We should not settle for just having a count of how many children we educated, but we should strive to measure impact by tracking if the lives of those children and their immediate family have improved over the years because of that child’s education. We should not track how many fishermen we trained, but how has the life of each fisherman and their immediate family improved because of their training. Is this easy? Absolutely not. I do however, believe that we should make sure we spend time trying to figure out how to best measure impact so that are constantly improving the quality of the metrics and getting closer and closer to “true impact”.

Here is an annual report from a nonprofit organization in 1925:

It has almost been a century, but how much have we really evolved from this report? We have progressed so much since 1925 and yet, how we measure the impact we have on society and those in need hasn’t really changed that much, except for larger numbers. 🙂

There are more than 30 billion (probably way more) webpages out there which is 5 times the world population. Few billion pages get added every day. We know EVERY detail about EVERY webpage – how it has evolved over time, which pages link to it, how many people access it, what language it is in, who is the author, etc. Yet, we can’t track nutrition levels, education levels, income, etc. for individuals. We have the tools, we just need get more focused on how we use the tools to measure “true impact”.

We can do it and I am sure we will soon!

1925 report from Camp Kern/Camp Ozone Historical Materials

When we announced the Give Health campaign earlier this month, we had an even bigger goal than our first matched campaign – raise $7,000 for public health projects to be matched by a fund created by a group of anonymous donors, doubling the overall impact and donations to $14,000.  Members of the Jolkona community came together to launch this campaign and see it through – we are excited to announce that last Monday, November 15th Give Health was fully funded!

Together, in just over two weeks, here’s the impact we made towards public health around the world:

  • 38 children saved from diarrhea in India
  • 2 doctors visits provided in Bangladesh
  • 8 HIV+ children in Cambodia received 6 months of medicines
  • 2 sets of farming tools provided in Nicaragua
  • 60 children fed in Uganda for 38 weeks each
  • 4 children in Sierra Leone each received 1 year of medicines & vitamins
  • 2 cataract surgeries provided in Bangladesh
  • 2 bags of seeds provided in Nicaragua
  • 4 days of medical supplies provided in Bangladesh
  • 2 elderly people in China received care for 1 year
  • 2 temporary latrines provided in Haiti

Thank you to everyone in the Jolkona community for your tremendous support!

For those who donated, you will receive proof of impact for the donation you made and the donation Give Health matched on your behalf. Matched gifts will be added to your accounts in January and you will receive proofs of impact once the projects are implemented.

Investing in public health doesn’t stop here

You can continue to see support of public health projects on the campaign page and by viewing the overall impact we’re making towards the UN Millennium Development Goals and other projects around the world.

I’m so excited to announce the “Give Health” matching campaign with Jolkona starting today. As a recent graduate student of Public Health, I truly understand the importance, the cost-effectiveness, and the need for public health projects around the world. Thanks to the generous support of an anonymous group of donors also passionate about the importance of public health, any donation you make to one of our public health projects this month, until we reach $7,000, will be matched by this grant so that you can DOUBLE your impact! If you don’t already know why supporting public health is so important I want to share a few insights.

What is global health?

Global health refers to health problems that transcend national borders or have a global political and economic impact. This includes problems such as infectious and insect-borne diseases that can spread from one country to another, but also other health problems that are of such magnitude that they have a global political and economic impact such as HIV/AIDS epidemic.

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Opportunity Collaboration 2010 (OC 2010) was an amazing experience for Nadia and me. For those not familiar with Opportunity Collaboration, it brings together close to 300 non-profit leaders, social enterprises, and funders with the goal of spurring conversations and collaboration around poverty alleviation. It is an un-conference where the focus is placed on getting things done versus hearing keynote speakers and panel talks. I have been reflecting on that experience since my return. For me, often times the best way to make a sense of things is to write down my thoughts and this blog post is my attempt to do just that.

One of my favorite discussions at OC 2010 was actually the first session where we analyzed Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter from Birmingham Jail. It was a perfect way to start this un-conference. It set the stage for everyone to bring an open, respectful, and cooperative attitude to the rest of the event. The participants of Opportunity Collaboration brought with them rich stories from the field that really added to the depth of the discussions all weekend.

Opportunity to collaborate

As the name implies, the focus of the event was on collaborations and partnerships. Nadia and I had to wear two hats while we were at the conference – seeking out partnership opportunities that we can fund through our web platform as well as meeting with potential funders to support and fund our operations.

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This week I had the opportunity to attend SOCAP10, one of the largest and most influential conferences in the field of social entrepreneurship and impact investing. The conference was themed around discussing the “intersection of money and meaning” and included major players in the field including the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Rockefeller Foundation, US AID, Omidyar Network, Kiva, and Acumen Fund amongst many others. It was overall a pretty amazing experience to meet so many people who are not only interested in making money but to also making the world better and are willing to do what it takes to make that happen.

If you’re new to the social capital market, here are a few keys concepts to understand:

  1. Social capital market – a “new” understanding that charitable dollars are still capital investments of precious resources and thus for-profit ideals should be applied to the non-profit sector to maximize social impact.
  2. Impact investing – Socially responsible investing, also known as socially-conscious or ethical investing, describes an investment strategy which seeks to maximize both financial return and social good.
  3. Social enterprise – organizations that prioritize social mission over profit-making and apply market-based strategies to achieve the social purpose. The movement includes both non-profits that use business models to pursue their mission and for-profit businesses whose primary purposes are social
  4. Social entrepreneur – someone who recognizes a social problem and uses entrepreneurial principles to organize, create, and manage a venture to make social change.
  5. Earned Income Model – a decidedly for-profit model that includes selling services and products as a revenue stream but is increasingly becoming an attractive vehicle for nonprofits.
  6. Crowd-funding – inspired by crowdsourcing, describes the collective cooperation, attention and trust by people who network and pool their money together, usually via the Internet, in order to support efforts initiated by other people.
  7. Green Jobs Movement – Shift towards jobs that generates electricity using renewable or nuclear fuels, agriculture jobs supplying corn or soy for transportation fuel, manufacturing jobs producing goods used in renewable power generation, equipment dealers and wholesalers specializing in renewable energy or energy-efficiency products, construction and installation of energy and pollution management systems, government administration of environmental programs, and supporting jobs in the engineering, legal, research and consulting fields.
  8. Triple Bottom Line – People, planet, profit. TBL expands the traditional reporting framework to take into account ecological and social performance in addition to financial performance.
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When we announced the MatchED Campaign, we had a big goal ahead of us – raise $5,000 in donations for education projects that will be matched, dollar for dollar, by Waggener Edstrom, doubling the overall impact and funds to $10,000. MatchED was designed to last one month and we are excited to announce that on Monday, Sept. 19th, MatchED was fully funded!

Together, in just one week, here’s the impact we made towards education around the world:

  • Books supplied to 10 classes in Rwanda
  • 12 girls educated in Afghanistan
  • 2 student in Kenya received school supplies
  • 2 Tibetan Student attended summer program
  • 80 books supplied in Tibet
  • 4 year-long scholarships given in Zambia
  • 22 months of tutoring provided in Guatemala
  • 4 students in USA got tech tools
  • 4 chairs provided to students in Sierra Leone
  • 12 Tibetan students educated
  • 28 year-long scholarships given in Guatemala
  • 2 events sponsored at a US school
  • 16 desks provided to a Zambian school

We are thankful to everyone in the Jolkona community for your tremendous support!

For those who donated, you will receive proof of impact for the donation you made and the donation Waggener Edstrom matched on your behalf. Matched gifts will be added to your account in mid-October and you will receive proofs of impact once the projects are implemented.

We are also thankful to Waggener Edstrom for their partnership, leadership, and support of this campaign. We look forward to partnering with them as well as other businesses in the future with campaigns that help further engage the corporate and social sectors.

Investing in education doesn’t stop here.

You can continue to see the support of education projects on the campaign page and by viewing the overall impact we’re making towards the U.N. Millennium Development Goals and other projects around the world.

On our blog, we’ll be sharing stories about the importance of supporting education projects around the world. We have some great guests posts lined up and we’re excited to share them with you!

Did you know that there are 115 million children around the world without primary education? And that 61.5 million of them are female?

In less developed countries, this translates to 1 out of every 3 children not attending school. Lower literacy rates are linked to higher poverty, HIV/AIDS, health issues, and great gender inequality, and more.

We’re excited to announce that Jolkona is partnering with Waggener Edstrom Worldwide on our first corporate-sponsored giving campaign called MatchED. From September 13th to October 13th, any donation you make through Jolkona towards one of our 17 education projects will be matched, dollar-for-dollar by Waggener Edstrom, up to $5,000.

For each donation you make, you will receive a proof of impact for your donation as well as the impact for the matched donation. So make an investment in education today and double your impact!

You can support the MatchED campaign, follow our progress and our total impact on our website, as well as on Facebook and Twitter (@Jolkona, #WEMatchED).

We’d like to thank Waggener Edstrom for their generosity and their leadership. Together, we can make a real global impact by investing in education this month!

Thanks to the generous support of the Jolkona community, we have raised almost $4,000 for our partner, Barakat, to help families displaced by the floods in Pakistan! As a result of your donations, the 70-75 households that took shelter in Attock, Punjab have all been taken care of. We’re excited to announce that this project is now completely sold out!

In our last blog post about Pakistan, we discussed how much of the $1.3 billion raised for Haiti’s earthquake relief still remains unused. Jolkona and our partner have learned from this experience and have decided to cap the Pakistan project at this point since our non-profit partner does not have the capacity to distribute additional funds for flood relief outside of the village they work in. You can rest assured that YOUR donations to this project are being used for aid and distributed to the families affected by the floods. Everyone who has made a donation will receive a proof of impact as soon as the gifts are implemented.

Thanks to your help, we were able to meet the immediate needs of the affected families who took refuge in Attock. We are working hard with our partner to add another project which will provide long-term benefits for these families.

Unfortunately, the need in Pakistan is still great. The UN reports that the flooding in the Sindh province of Pakistan is going from “bad to worse.” Whether you’ve given to our project or not, we encourage you to give what you can to other relief organizations working in Pakistan. See the short list of organizations we recommend below:

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GET INVOLVED!